INLS 520 - Schedule and readings

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Table of Contents

About this schedule

What is here?

  • Objective(s) for each session
  • List of tasks to prepare you for each session (readings, reading responses, etc.)
  • List of tasks you are ready to begin after each session
  • Links to slides or other materials shown/used in each session
  • Link to the section of the course wiki "Useful Resources" page relevant to each session
  • Link to the course to-do list: a list of all the things you need to do for this class, by due date/deadline.

To-do list

  • Supposedly I can easily export all your course tasks and their due dates in iCal format. That will go here in the next couple of days.
  • Also there will be a simple list of tasks in chronological order, with due dates, in case you want to keep it and cross stuff off. It will be like this, except up-to-date and prettier.

Jan 12 (M) Session 1: What is this class going to be like? (Sessions left after today: 27)

Objectives

Orient students to the class

Course overview in a nutshell case: recipe collection

To do before class:

TODO Order your textbook

TODO Complete "Pre-course admin" tasks

To do after this class:

PROJECT Choose project partner (not evaluated) DEADLINE: 2009-01-16 Fri

PROJECT Create a wiki home page for your project (not evaluated) DEADLINE: 2009-01-16 Fri 17:00

PROJECT Create a section/page on the wiki defining/describing your document type for the project    520project

DEADLINE: 2009-01-16 Fri 17:00
SCHEDULED: 2009-01-12 Mon

Jan 14 (W) Session 2: What are we doing and to/with what are we doing it? (Sessions left after today: 26)

Objectives

Distinguish between information and documents embodying information.

Name the core tasks of all information organization.

Explain why it is necessary to define and discuss information and documents separately in the context of information organization.

Name issues that complicate the task of organizing information and explain why the issues are problematic.

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 1 DEADLINE: 2009-01-13 Tue 23:57    readings

RESPOND Submit a Reading response DEADLINE: 2009-01-13 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

To do after this class:

PROJECT Put together a collection of documents SCHEDULED: 2009-01-14 Wed DEADLINE: 2009-01-20 Tue 23:58    520project

Jan 19 (M) Session : MLKJr Holiday - No class (Sessions left after today: 26)

Jan 21 (W) Session 3: Why do we organize information and how do we know if it is working? (Sessions left after today: 25)

Objectives

Give examples of the user needs supported by the five objectives of a fully featured information organization system.

Analyze and describe the value of each objective for a practical system in context, considering information type, who will use the system, and their needs.

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 2    readings

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-01-20 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

To do after this class:

PROJECT Determine objectives of systems for different users DEADLINE: 2009-01-30 Fri 23:58    520project

Jan 26 (M) Session 4: How can we think about organizing information in an organized way? (Sessions left after today: 24)

Objectives

Identify a domain's important entities, attributes, and relationships in the context of a specific use

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 3 DEADLINE: 2009-01-25 Sun 23:57    readings

READ (OPTIONAL) If you are not familiar with the concepts of entities, attributes, and relationships, read about them on Wikipedia.

READ Choose your own adventure reading assignment DEADLINE: 2009-01-25 Sun 23:58    readings

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-01-25 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

To do after this class:

PROJECT Attempt a model of the documentary universe of your document type. DEADLINE: 2009-02-06 Fri 23:59

:520project:

Jan 28 (W) Session 5: How do we specify how to organize information? Bibliographic languages (Sessions left after today: 23)

Objectives

Distinguish between creating a description and creating a surrogate.

Describe why it is important to recognize the different roles played by descriptions and surrogates.

Identify the bibliographic language functions of a given metadata standard. In other words, when you run across a new standard, you should be able to determine whether it functions as a vocabulary, specification of semantics alone, specification of semantics and syntax, etc.

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 4 DEADLINE: 2009-01-27 Tue 23:57    readings

READ Gilliland, Anne J. (2008) "Setting the stage." In Baca, Murtha (ed.) Introduction to metadata, online edition, version 3.0. Los Angeles: Getty Research Institute.(html or pdf) DEADLINE: 2009-01-27 Tue 23:58    readings

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-01-27 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

Feb 2 (M) Session 6: How do we represent information so we can organize it?: Principles of description (Sessions left after today: 22)

Objective

In a given context, define a sufficient and necessary set of descriptive data elements for a set of documents, using the five objectives (Chapter 2) and the other principles discussed in Chapter 5 in your evaluation.

Be able to translate a snippet of simple RDF into a natural language description

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 5 DEADLINE: 2009-02-01 Sun 23:57    readings

READ Tauberer, Joshua. What is RDF? (Resource Description Framework) DEADLINE: 2009-02-01 Sun 23:57    readings

RESPOND Submit a reading response on the Svenonius and Jacob/Shaw reading. DEADLINE: 2009-02-01 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

RESPOND Explain in natural language what the following RDF expresses. Put this in the same email as your reading response.

<rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
    xmlns:rec="http://www.infomuse.net/recipes/">

    <rdf:Description rdf:about="http://www.food.com/pizza">
         <rec:ingredient>        
            <rdf:Description rdf:about="http://www.ingredients.org/onion" />
         </rec:ingredient>
         <rec:ingredient>        
            <rdf:Description rdf:about="http://www.ingredients.org/cheese" />
         </rec:ingredient>
    </rdf:Description>

    <rdf:Description rdf:about="http://www.ingredients.org/onion">
        <rec:quantity>1</rec:quantity>
        <rec:size>large</rec:size>
        <rec:prep>sliced</rec:prep>
    </rdf:Description>

    <rdf:Description rdf:about="http://www.ingredients.org/cheese">
        <rec:quantity>1.5</rec:quantity>
        <rec:unit>cup</rec:unit>
        <rec:prep>grated</rec:prep>
    </rdf:Description>
</rdf:RDF>

To do after this class:

PROJECT Application profile or schema DEADLINE: 2009-02-27 Fri 23:59    520project

Feb 4 (W) Session 7: How do we bring like information together? Work languages (Sessions left after today: 21)

Objectives

Identify work-level attributes

Recognize challenges in creating work-level description

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 6 DEADLINE: 2009-02-03 Tue 23:57    readings

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-02-03 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

Feb 9 (M) Session 8: How do we distinguish similar information? Document languages (Sessions left after today: 20)

Objectives

Explain the distinction between content and form/carrier.

Identify attributes describing documents/objects at the document level.

Recognize challenges in creating document-level description.

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 7 DEADLINE: 2009-02-08 Sun 23:57    readings

  • Reading guide

READ Dunsire, Gordon. (2007) "Distinguishing content from carrier: the RDA/ONIX framework for resource categorization." D-Lib Magazine 12(1/2): n.p. Click here for reading notes.

  • Focus on the following sections:
    • The framework
    • Beyond RDA and ONIX
  • For additional practical examples of the framework and how it might work in an information system, see the slides on pp. 7 and 8 in this 2008 presentation by Dunsire

OPTIONAL: READ Veltman, Kim H.. (2000) "Content, form and expression in electronic media." In Musica Scienza 2000, p. 1-9. (Click here for reading notes.)

  • Notes:
    • As this paper is by now quite old, its reports of "new technologies" are now outdated.
    • Also, I argue with the author in my head about half of the time I'm reading the article.
    • HOWEVER, I am giving this as an optional reading because I like: a) the presentation of ideas about the separation of information (content) and form; (b) the historical situation of the relationships among technologies, form, and content; and (c) the foregrounding of the tools used to create content that is then consumed, used, and of course, organized.
    • On that last point, personal information management research has found that some users think of .doc files as only existing and available for manipulation through the interface of MS Word—no concept of copy/pasting the file in the computer's directory structure, opening the file in another tool, etc. All of these people's digital information is thus organized first based on what tool was used to create it or first access it: organization is by form, where form = tool.
    • p. 7 - Consider the quote from Chiariglione in terms of objectives for an information system (or systems)
    • p. 9 - 2nd paragraph of Sec. 7 - This idea is something I think about a lot, since I study personal information management: we must all do the work of "information professionals" for ourselves on top of our own work in order to get things done efficiently. Information work is labor. While some of it can and has been automated, usually the labor just gets shifted around.

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-02-08 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

Feb 11 (W) Session 9: How do we speak a bibliographic language intelligibly? Metadata, or an unstandardized host of standards (Sessions left after today: 19)

Objectives

Discuss difficulties in attaining information interoperability

Explain the role of metadata in achieving interoperability

Demonstrate when/why one would consult or create model mappings/crosswalks, application profiles, and metadata registries.

To do before class:

READ Choose your own path. See the wiki for details. DEADLINE: 2009-02-10 Tue 23:57    readings

  • Reading guide

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-02-10 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

Feb 16 (M) Session 10: How do we speak a bibliographic language intelligibly? Metadata nuts and bolts (Sessions left after today: 18)

Objectives

Interpret metadata schema

Describe

To do before class:

READ XML, etc. choose your own adventure See wiki for details DEADLINE: 2009-02-16 Mon 15:30    readings

NO READING RESPONSE REQUIRED

Feb 18 (W) Session 11: How do we transmit a bibliographic language intelligibly? Encoding standards (Sessions left after today: 17)

To do before class:

Install and try using at least one of the software tools listed on the wiki.

To do after this class:

PROJECT Make metadata records for your collection DEADLINE: 2009-03-06 Fri 23:59    520project

Feb 23 (M) Session 12: How do we think (about subjects)? Concepts and categories (Sessions left after today: 16)

Objectives

To do before class:

READ Huggett, M.; Hoos, H. & Rensink, R. Cognitive Principles for Information Management: the Principles of Mnemonic Associative Knowledge (P-Mak) Minds and Machines, 2007, 17, 445-485. Read the parts marked with a blue line down the side. Exactly how the authors propose implementing the system is of less importance than a) what the features/capabilities of the system should be, and b) why they should be that way. DEADLINE: 2002-02-22 Sun 23:56    readings

READ Categories and concepts crash course DEADLINE: 2002-02-22 Sun 23:57    readings

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-02-22 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

To do after this class:

PROJECT Begin scouting for subject languages relevant to your document type (not evaluated)

Feb 25 (W) Session 13: How do we know what the subject of information is? Subject analysis (Sessions left after today: 15)

Objectives

  • Understand different facets of subject and not-quite subject
  • Domain analysis, warrant
  • Determining the subject of a work

Mar 2 (M) Session 14: What kinds of subject languages and semantic relationships are there? (Sessions left after today: 14)

Objectives

To do before class:

READ FIRST: Sections 1-4 of Zeng, Marcia Lei. 2005. Construction of Controlled Vocabularies, A Primer (based on Z39.19). DEADLINE: 2009-03-01 Sun 23:58    readings

READ THEN: Svenonius, Ch. 9 (click on this heading for a list of sections to read) DEADLINE: 2009-03-01 Sun 23:57    readings

You have already read about many of the ideas in this chapter in the other readings. Please read the sections below:

  • Methods of Semantic Disambiguation, p. 148 – Automation, p. 155
  • Definition of equivalence, p. 158 – Automation, p. 159–160
  • Related terms–Lack of rigor, p. 161 – Automation, p. 162

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-03-01 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

To do after this class:

PROJECT Identify terms, concepts, and semantic relationships DEADLINE: 2009-03-15 Sun 23:59    520project

Mar 4 (W) Session 15: How do we name subjects? Alphabetic-subject languages. Controlled vocabulary (Sessions left after today: 13)

Objectives

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Ch. 8 DEADLINE: 2009-03-03 Tue 23:58    readings

FOR REFERENCE, LOOK AT: ANSI/NISO Z39.19-2005 Guidelines for the construction, format, and management of monolingual controlled vocabularies. If you are confused by anything in Zeng, this document goes into more depth and gives many more examples that clarify things.

TOOLS: Thesauri can be constructed with ThManager or Protege 4 with SKOS Editor plugin

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-03-03 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

Mar 9 (M) Session : Spring Break - No class (Sessions left after today: 13)

Mar 11 (W) Session : Spring Break - No class (Sessions left after today: 13)

Mar 16 (M) Session 16:How do we name subjects? Alphabetic-subject languages. Controlled vocabulary (Sessions left after today: 12)

Objectives

To do before class:

READ See wiki page for details    readings

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-03-15 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

To do after this class:

PROJECT Thesaurus construction DEADLINE: 2009-03-27 Fri 23:59    520project

Mar 18 (W) Session 17: How do we structure subjects? Classificatory subject languages (Sessions left after today: 11)

Objectives

Identify the main kinds of classificatory structures: hierarchies, trees, paradigms, and faceted schemes.

Discuss the uses of classification schemes.

To do before class:

READ Kwasnik, Barbara H.. (1999) "The role of classification in knowledge representation and discovery." Library Trends 48(1): 22-47. pdf - nice layout, but text hard to read - pdf - web-page layout, clearer text    readings

OPTIONAL William Denton, "How to make a faceted classification and put it on the web" - Read through section 2.5 for more examples of aspects of faceted classification. If you are creating a faceted classification scheme, you will want to read the rest while working on your scheme. Suffers from some link-rot, but is a good step-by-step tutorial. Related podcasts he mentions now begin here. (I have not listened to them, and so cannot vouch for their quality)

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-03-17 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

Mar 23 (M) Session 18: How do we structure subjects? Classificatory subject languages (Sessions left after today: 10)

Objectives

Describe the types of classificatory notation

Discuss the purpose of subject language syntax (citation order)

Analyze classifications in terms what they say about what they organize, and what they leave unsaid

Build a small faceted classification scheme

To do before class:

READ Svenonius, Chapter 10

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-03-22 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

To do after this class:

PROJECT Begin faceted classification DEADLINE: 2009-04-22 Fri 23:59    520project

Mar 25 (W) Session 19: Tying up loose ends of classification, looking toward knowledge representation (Sessions left after today: 9)

To do before class: Nothing. You'll thank yourself for getting a head start on next week's readings, though.

Mar 30 (M) Session 20: How can knowledge be represented and organized? (Sessions left after today: 8)

Objectives

Describe the goal of knowledge representation and some of its applications

Contrast the requirements of representing knowledge for human use, versus for machine use

Explain what an ontology is and some ways in which ontologies are used

Apr 1 (W) Session 21: How can knowledge be represented and organized? (Sessions left after today: 7)

Objectives

Identify and describe the basic components of an ontology

Describe the different types of ontologies: upper (or top-level), domain, and application

Build a small, simple ontology

To do before class:

READ Gruber, Thomas R.. (1995) "Toward principles for the design of ontologies used for knowledge sharing?." International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 43(5-6): 907-928. Concentrate on: Section 2 (the classic definition of ontologies in IS), Section 3 (Design criteria for ontologies), Section 4.3, 4.3.1 (Case study of ontology for sharing bibliographic data). Skip the code if you can't make heads or tails of it.

READ Sharman, Raj; Kishore, Rajiv & Ramesh, Ram. (2004) "Computational ontologies and information systems II: formal specification." The Communications of the Association for Information Systems 14: 1-25. Article 9 (web - pdf) Concentrate on sections 2 and 3.

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-03-29 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

Apr 6 (M) Session 22: Can we make the Web smart? Semantic Web (Sessions left after today: 6)

Objectives

Describe the Semantic Web vision

Explain how information organization techniques play a role in the construction of the Semantic Web

To do before class:

READ Berners-Lee, Tim; Hendler, James & Lassila, Ora. (2001) "The Semantic Web: A new form of Web content that is meaningful to computers will unleash a revolution of new possibilities." Scientific American : 1-6. web - pdf    readings

READ Explore site: linkeddata.org

OPTIONAL: A doubter's (amusing) view of The Semantic Web: Marshall, Catherine C. (2004) Taking a stand on the Semantic Web.

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-03-31 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

To do after class:

PROJECT Begin ontology/concept map for your domain DEADLINE: 2009-04-22 Fri 23:59    520project

Apr 8 (W) Session 23: How can information be organized automatically? (Sessions left after today: 5)

Objectives

Name some automated information organization techniques

Describe how some automated techniques could be applied to information organization tasks we have discussed this semester.

To do before class:

READ Dumais, Susan. (2003) "Data-driven approaches to information access." Cognitive science 27: 491-524. Do not spend too much time trying to understand all of the details of the statistical processes described in this paper. Focus on the main steps given for each technique and the sections on applications of the techniques.

READ Read abstracts and summaries listed on the Natural language resources page at AITopics. This is to give to a sense of the range of work being done in this field that is closely related to our interests in LIS.

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-04-05 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

To do after class:

PROJECT Begin Metadata records, phase 2 DEADLINE: 2009-04-27 Mon 23:59    520project

Apr 13 (M) Session 24: How do working groups organize information? (Sessions left after today: 4)

Objectives

The organization of information and its resultant artifacts play roles in groups beyond providing efficient retrieval. Discuss some of these other roles.

Describe some of the implications of the above on the design of information systems for organizations

To do before class:

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-04-07 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

Apr 15 (W) Session 25: I CAN HAZ ORDER? Organizing information on the web (Sessions left after today: 3)

Objectives

To do before class:

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-04-12 Sun 23:59    reading_responses

Apr 20 (M) Session 26: How do you organize information? Personal information management (Sessions left after today: 2)

Objectives

To do before class:

READ Jones, William P. (2007) "Personal information management." 41(1): 453-504. In Cronin, Blaise (ed.) Annual Review of Information Science and Technology. – Clear and easy reading, with over 10 pages of notes and references. Read at least the parts marked with a red bar in the margin.    readings

TODO Think about your own personal information management strategies and be ready to discuss them in class in terms of what you read in the article.

RESPOND Submit a reading response DEADLINE: 2009-04-14 Tue 23:59    reading_responses

Apr 22 (W) Session 27: Presentations (Sessions left after today: 1)

Apr 27 (M) Session 28: Presentations (Sessions left after today: 0)

May 7 (no class) All components of course project are completed for final grading DEADLINE: 2009-05-07 Thu 16:00

Author: Kristina M. Spurgin <kristina at infomuse removeledot net>

Date: Last updated: 04/14/2009 at 22:10.

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